Megan Melling

Because of the Arab influence, the Algarve has a huge variety of ingredients

See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine December 2015

This month’s Picture Perfect photographer is Megan Melling (24) who lives in Lagos. Born American, but grown up in the Algarve, Megan studied Cookery and Food Production in Estoril. She got interested in photography along the way, bought a reflex camera and followed some intensive photography courses. Now she combines her two passions: food and photography.

Not only yummy pictures can be found on her blog, but also recipes, ranging from Algarvian carrots to a step-by-step explanation of how to roast your own tomatoes. All the pictures have been taken without artificial lighting. Megan: “I like natural photography and playing around with composition. The natural beauty of food, that’s what I want to show, for people to get a sentiment out of the photo; basically I want to make pictures that make people hungry.”

Megan on food photography in the Algarve: “Because of the Arab influence, the Algarve has a huge variety of ingredients. There are figs, almonds, carob flour, fresh fish and seafood, and loads of different fruit and vegetables. The versatility is enormous and the sunny days here make for lovely home-grown produce. I use ingredients that I bought at local markets or grew on my family farm: I make a point of never photographing food that isn’t local or traditional.”

 

Food photography:

This month’s Picture Perfect shows green pumpkin slices drizzled with olive oil, honey and balsamic vinegar. It was taken on a Nikon D3200 with a 50mm lens, ISO 200, f5.6, 1/125. Like this pic? See more on Megan’s blog.

Want to try and make a perfect picture like this one as well? Here are Megan’s top three tips on food photography:

  1. Always photograph sideways or against the light source, as shadows will give your picture texture and make it interesting. Natural light is always best, but never photograph in the blazing sun.
  2. Composition is key. The way you display an edible moment will completely change a viewer’s perception. Compose a scene that makes sense, for example by including a wooden board, a dishcloth or a few ingredients. Kitchen props don’t have to be expensive; use an old family heirloom or just buy some wooden spoons at the supermarket.
  3. It’s worth investing in good equipment. Pictures are way better when taken with a DSLR camera. Do use the manual setting and experiment a lot, also with different lenses. A lens with a low aperture, for example, makes for a dramatic effect on details.

Green pumpkin slices drizzled with olive oil, honey and balsamic vinegar by Megan Melling

 

See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine December 2015

Posted in Picture Perfect.

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