Medronho

Discover fascinating facts about Portugal’s traditional fruit brandy See the original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine September 2016   Strawberry tree Aguardente de medronhos, aka Medronho, is made from the fruit of the medronho tree, the Arbutus Unedo. Although this translates as ‘strawberry tree’, the fruits aren’t strawberries, but look more like small lychees. The […]

A gin experience

See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine August 2016 Cocktails are a must at a party, especially in summertime. Since gin is the hippest spirit out there at the moment, this month Enjoy the Algarve follows a gin workshop in Vilamoura. Turns out there’s way more to gin than just buying the supermarket’s own brand, adding […]

Time for cake

If there’s no cake, it isn’t a party! Instead of having a slice of New York cheesecake, Dutch apple pie or Victorian sponge, why not try something a bit more Algarve-like? Although they don’t look as dainty or colourful as their foreign counterparts, Portuguese cakes do taste nice. Try these three. See the original article […]

Farming in water

It smells like the sea, lives in water, is grown in the Algarve, can be eaten and starts with an ‘s’. Ten to one your answer will be shrimps, sardines or seafood. But there’s more. In the hills near Monchique, Georges Porta and Cristina Palma Brito farm spirulina. A food worth knowing. Pictures by Kyle Rodriguez […]

Piri piri sauce

Discover fascinating facts about Portugal’s most spicy sauce See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine April 2016   Crushed chillies Originally from Portugal, piri piri sauce (sometimes called peri peri) is also popular in Angola, Namibia, Mozambique and South Africa. The basic ingredients of this molho picante (spicy sauce) are crushed chillies, lemon juice and oil. […]

Alfarroba

Discover fascinating facts about the fruit of one of the most famous Algarve trees See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine March 2016   No need to water Weirdly shaped, the carob bean, alfarroba in Portuguese, hangs from the tree like a pea. It’s also sometimes called a pod. Inside, you’ll find many small beans as well […]

Port

Discover fascinating facts about Portugal’s most famous fortified wine See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine January 2016   Douro Valley Port is a fortified wine, which means a distilled grape spirit, brandy, is added to the wine during the production process. This stops the fermentation and boosts the alcohol content. It’s produced in the […]

Chef’s recipe – Leonel Pereira

Born in Martinlongo in the Alcoutim area, Leonel Pereira is one of the most talented Portuguese chefs. He’s head chef at restaurant São Gabriel in Quinta do Lago which has, this year again, been awarded a Michelin Star. Leonel’s cooking combines traditional Portuguese flavours with a contemporary twist and all his dishes show his Algarvian roots. See […]

Porco preto

Tradition is important in the Portuguese cuisine, especially when it comes to porco preto. In the Monchique region, producing Portugal’s most flavoursome meat is done by methods that have been passed on from generation to generation. According to the local Iberian black pig farmers, this is the only way to keep the traditional flavours alive. […]

An ode to olive oil

Olive oil; it’s a huge part of the Portuguese diet. And a tasty one. Connoisseurs sample different varieties of oil like they would taste different wines. Some of the best extra virgin olive oils in the world are produced here in the Algarve, in Moncarapacho. In Monte Rosa you’ll find modern machines, but ancient traditions. […]

Making tibornas

Tuna muxama: That’s tuna which is prepared in exactly the same way as smoked ham. It’s traditional from this region and very expensive as nowadays there’s only one guy in the Algarve producing it See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine December 2015 Friends are coming over for a drink (and secretly expect to […]

Cataplana

Discover fascinating facts about one of the symbols of the Algarve’s cuisine See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine December 2015   Food or pan? Confusion alert: the word cataplana is both used for the pan and for the dish inside it. The cooking device is traditionally made from copper. It consists of two clam […]

5 foodie Algarve Christmas presents

What to get your mum/brother/auntie/grandpa/neighbour/friend for Christmas? Not a clue? We neither. But if they like food, they might enjoy one of the gifts below. We’ve even included tips about the suitability of the presents. (Disclaimer: Enjoy the Algarve can’t be held responsible for disappointed friends or relatives who would rather have received a new car, socks, […]

Licor Beirão

Discover fascinating facts about Portugal’s best-known sweet herbal liquor See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine September 2015 Medicine: Originally, Licor Beirão was produced as a medicine. In the 19th century, a pharmacy in Lousã (in the district of Coimbra) claimed it was the antidote against stomach aches. Some decades later, when alcoholic beverages […]

The journey from sea to plate

Olhão fish auction Grilled, baked or BBQ-ed. Sardines, mackerels or tuna. Freshly cooked, in a can or spread on a slice of bread. However you want your fish, the Algarve is the place to get it. But there’s a story that often remains untold: what happens with the fish between catching and eating? Enjoy the Algarve gives […]

Filled sardines

For two persons as a main or four persons as a starter:     Clean the sardines Clean and descale 12 sardines and take out all the bones. (Good luck. This is a lot of work so don’t start too late. If you’re already feeling hungry and still need to clean the sardines, just grill […]

Cascas, Olhão

The most important thing when it comes to seafood? “Its freshness,” is the immediate answer of both Cascas’ owner Flávio Palminha and chef Ana Tavares. This attitude shows in the menu: not all dishes are available every day; it completely depends on what the sea has to offer. People who don’t know what to order […]

Pastel de nata

Discover fascinating facts about the light flaky puff pastry tarts with a slightly burned creamy custard filling. See original article in Enjoy the Algarve – magazine June 2015 History: Pastéis de nata were first created in the 18th century, by Catholic monks at the Jerónimos Monastery in the civil parish of Santa Maria de Belém in Lisbon. As convents […]